Philippines christians

Philippines Christians CATHEDRAL ATTACKED AND TORCHED

The Philippines: Christians and the Politics of Liberation | Torre, Ed De La | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. The Philippines: Christians and the Politics of Liberation: plstudios.se: Torre, Ed De La: Fremdsprachige Bücher. ILIGAN CITY, Philippines (Reuters) - Bishop Edwin Dela Pena was sipping coffee after dinner in a southern Philippines coastal town last Tuesday when he. Bibliographic Details. Published in: CIIR justice paper. Main Author: DeLaTorre, Edicio Format: Print Book. Language: English. Subito Delivery Service. Christians in dialogue with Islamic spirituality in the Philippines. Saved in: In: Viele Wege - ein Ziel Year: , Pages: Further subjects: B Philippines.

Philippines christians

8 Christians should recognize. 3 | Ibid, 4 | Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP), Pastoral Exhorta- tion on Philippine Politics, section D. ILIGAN CITY, Philippines (Reuters) - Bishop Edwin Dela Pena was sipping coffee after dinner in a southern Philippines coastal town last Tuesday when he. Bibliographic Details. Published in: CIIR justice paper. Main Author: DeLaTorre, Edicio Format: Print Book. Language: English. Subito Delivery Service.

Apart from expanding its trade, the evangelization of indios was a clear mission of the empire. Led by Father Urdaneta, Spanish Augustinian friars moved from Mexico to the Philippines upon the request of Philip II and became the first official Catholic missionaries in the country.

The Dominicans, Recollects, Franciscans, and Jesuits followed suit over the centuries. Churches around the country were built through polos y servicios , a law which forced men between the ages of 16 to 60 years old to render labor for the local governor or the parish priest.

The priests also became the de facto administrators of the Spanish regime in the towns in which they were assigned.

This made them very powerful, even against local secular authorities. Given the small number of missionaries and administrators, the policy made governance and religious education efficient.

For example, mass baptisms were not practiced just because a datu local leader converted. Although some missionaries destroyed images larawan , the majority relied on nonviolent persuasion to convince local converts to abandon their indigenous worship and practices.

Friars made it a strict requirement for any native wanting to be baptized to have learned the tenets of Doctrina Cristiana , a document spelling out Catholic prayers, morality, and practices.

Church leaders also taught catechisms—translated into vernacular languages—to young people. Friars ensured too that Christian teaching took over indigenous beliefs about restitution, sexual morality, and nature worship.

Polygamy and slavery, for example, had to be renounced before baptism. Church bells rang as a reminder for communities and families to recite the Angelus and other prayers.

Mass attendance was also recorded every Sunday. In many cases, the Catholic pantheon of saints replaced local deities believed to be behind the agricultural cycle, though the holidays and festivals persisted—just under the banner of the patron saints.

Consequently, by the 17th century, Catholicism had become the pervasive religion among lowland Filipinos, especially in Luzon and the Visayas.

Not all natives embraced the religion wholesale. In , local leaders Bankaw and Tamblot led anti-Catholic uprisings on the islands of Leyte and Bohol.

Over the centuries, Spanish forces also tried to penetrate some parts of Mindanao but resistance among Muslim communities relegated them to coastal areas.

Muslim resistance involved what the Spaniards called juramentados , swordsmen who were ready to die for their cause. Many other indigenous communities in Mindanao—collectively called lumad native —retained their existing beliefs and practices.

Muslim communities in Mindanao never recognized the authority of the Spanish regime over their territories.

In the local translation of the peace treaty signed in between Spain and the Sultanate of Sulu, the latter was only named a protectorate. But this provision did not keep Spain from including Sulu when the Philippines was handed over to the United States after its defeat in the Spanish-American War in This historical moment serves as a backdrop to secessionist movements, Moro insurgency, and the peace process in Mindanao.

Various documents of the Catholic church in the Philippines, including its local catechism, assume the Catholic faith is part and parcel of being Filipino.

This idea obviously overlooks the presence of other religious minorities in the country, such as Islam, and the growing prominence of other Christian groups, like evangelicals and Iglesia ni Cristo an indigenous church.

But the assumption makes sociological sense for two reasons. On one hand, Catholicism has become a cultural attribute, given the extent to which it affects everyday Filipino life.

Over the centuries, Filipinos internalized Catholicism because church rituals related to their practical concerns.

Indigenous religious practices were largely about livelihood, prosperity, healing, and safety. This understanding was very different from Christian theology that brought ethics and worship together.

In this light, Catholic sacraments, beliefs, and objects interested indigenous Filipinos to the extent that they contributed to health and livelihood.

Holy water, Latin prayers, and the intermediary role of saints fed into local beliefs. This syncretisation became a significant factor in why Christianization did not completely eradicate indigenous practices.

Even today, amulets with Latin prayers and other Catholic symbols are readily available outside Quiapo Church in Manila.

The same church is home to the Black Nazarene, whose annual feast gathers millions of devotees every year in a procession around the old city of Manila.

Towels that touch the image are believed to transmit miraculous powers of healing. On the other hand, Catholicism has also become a religion that Filipinos use to empower themselves.

This is a salient theme in much of Philippine historical writing. In his influential work, Pasyon and Revolution , historian Reynaldo Ileto makes the case that the natives drew from the Pasyon or Passion to understand their suffering at the hands of Spaniards.

An epic narrative sung during Lent, the Pasyon recounts the suffering of Christ. During the Spanish period, clergy used this for religious socialization but natives received it in a different light.

The suffering of Christ mirrored their own and empowered them in their struggle against the colonial regime. See also: Moro ethnic group.

Main article: History of the Philippines. Main article: Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. Main article: Hinduism in the Philippines.

Main article: Buddhism in the Philippines. Main articles: Anito , Indigenous Philippine folk religions , Deities of Philippine mythology , and Religion in pre-colonial Philippines.

Main article: Irreligion in the Philippines. Further information: Freedom of religion in the Philippines. United States Department of State.

July 28, Retrieved June 25, The survey states that Islam is the largest minority religion, constituting approximately 5 percent of the population.

May 29, The Philippine Star. Retrieved , "Eight million Muslim Filipinos, representing 10 percent of the total Philippine population, Eerdmans Publishing.

Retrieved January 7, Retrieved June 7, Archived from the original on July 19, Retrieved January 19, Pew Research Center.

Archived from the original on August 20, Archived from the original on July 8, Retrieved June 18, May 18, Archived from the original on December 1, Retrieved June 11, July 19, Pew Research.

January 9, On being godless and good: Irreligious Pinoys speak out:'God is not necessary to be a good' Archived September 14, , at the Wayback Machine , Rappler.

June 4, December 19, Archived from the original on September 17, Retrieved September 17, Archived PDF from the original on February 18, October Archived PDF from the original on October 11, Retrieved July 14, Philippines in Figures.

June Retrieved April 1, Archived from the original on September 5, Archived from the original on June 22, Retrieved March 22, Archived from the original on March 9, Archived from the original on January 7, Retrieved November 5, Anderson, Gerald H.

Orbis Books. Asian American religions: the making and remaking of borders and boundaries. Westview Press. April 2, Archived from the original on December 4, Retrieved November 13, Archived from the original on November 16, Eagle News.

Archived from the original on November 17, Archived from the original on December 21, Retrieved March 7, Archived from the original on July 15, Retrieved April 7, Orthodox Church in the Philippines.

Archived from the original on September 30, Retrieved August 2, Philemon Castro. Archived from the original on October 7, Archived from the original PDF on January 8, Archived from the original on February 4, Retrieved May 9, September Retrieved November 23, Retrieved July 22, January 8, , p.

Retrieved on March 27, Watch Tower Society. Archived from the original on July 16, Retrieved May 21, Retrieved May 24, Philippine Studies.

Retrieved July 15, June 23, Archived from the original on February 19, Celestino C. Archived from the original on July 3, Retrieved August 11, Maria Eleanor Elape Valeros.

Archived from the original on February 8, Retrieved on July 16, Berman Jewish DataBank. American Jewish Year Book Retrieved July 16, Buddhism in the Philippines.

Retrieved March 16, Some Aspects of Asia and Culture. Abhinav Publications. Essays in Biography.

Archived from the original on August 5, Retrieved June 1, God Passes By. Archived from the original on May 12, Retrieved June 6, In Memoriam. Table of Contents and pp.

Archived from the original on September 6, The Association of Religion Data Archives. Archived from the original on April 14, Retrieved July 4, Philippine Daily Inquirer.

Archived from the original on June 21, Washington, D. Corpuz, Onofre D. The Philippines. Gowing, Peter G. McArnis, eds. The Muslim Filipinos.

Manila: Solidaridad, Mercado, Leonardo N. Filipino Religious Psychology. Ramos, Maximo D. Creatures of Philippine Lower Mythology.

Sturtevant, David R. Popular Uprisings in the-Philippines , Ithaca: Cornell University Press, Are you an educator or education professional looking for professional development resources?

Read about our online courses! Religion in the Philippines. A Short History of the Philippines. New York: Mentor Books, Carroll, John J.

Philippine Institutions. Additional Background Reading on Asia. Student Jerry Tian gives us his perspective. North Korea: Looking Beyond the Stereotypes.

We've compiled resources to help you cut through the stereotypes surrounding North Korea and more deeply examine the country, its people, and the complexities of its politics and nuclear program.

China Learning Initiatives. The World's Most Incredible Alphabet. Hint: It was invented to fit a language that previously used a borrowed writing system.

Visualize the World. Museum resources and educational resources that help students develop visual literacy and a better understanding of the world.

Revelations from the Brush. A case for practicing calligraphy from one learner's perspective. Are You Looking for PD?

Retrieved on July 16, Will the church step up? Gruppensexspiele article: Xxx bangbros com Orthodox Church. Ebony lesbian piss July 16, 15 porn Iglesia ni Cristo. Are You Looking for PD? Religion Tranny xxxx the Philippines. Main articles: AnitoIndigenous Philippine folk religions Video porno tub, Deities of Philippine mythologyand Pantyhose poses in pre-colonial Philippines. In many cases, the Catholic pantheon of saints replaced local deities believed Blackfriendfinder be behind the agricultural cycle, though the holidays and festivals persisted—just under the banner of the patron saints. Comment on this item Name:.

Philippines Christians -

Beer, Bettina Hrsg. Mangahas Philippine History. Chong, Terence und Daniel P. London: Routledge.

In May , in the city of Marawi, a civilian bus was stopped by jihadis; when 9 passengers were discovered to be Christian — apparently because they were not able to quote the Koran — they were tied together and shot dead, execution style.

The jihadis who took over Marawi during the uprising forced women into sex-slavery and ordered Christian men embrace Islam or be used as human shields against the Philippine Army.

January's deadly church-bombing, which claimed 20 lives and wounded more than , is the latest reminder that, as with other nations that have a sizeable Muslim minority, the Philippines is embroiled in the jihad.

While the ostensible reason behind it may be political or territorial, the sadistic hate that accompanies attacks on Christians and their churches suggests that ideology is the ultimate cause.

In May , an extremist uprising erupted in the majority-Muslim city of Marawi, Philippines. Pictured: Smoke rises from the scene of fighting in Marawi on May 30, At least 20 people were killed and wounded.

At am, two explosives were detonated about a minute apart in or near the Cathedral of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Jolo.

According to the Associated Press :. Photographs on social media showed human bodies and remains strewn on the street just outside the cathedral.

Last heard, the officiating priest, Fr. Ricky Bacolcol, "was still in shock and could not speak about what happened," said a colleague.

After the first bomb detonated, army troops and police posted outside the cathedral rushed in, at which point the second bomb went off.

Fifteen of the slain were civilians, five were military men; 90 of the wounded were civilians.

The cathedral, located in a Muslim-majority area, was heavily guarded; it had been hit before. In , Catholic Bishop, Benjamin de Jesus, was gunned down just outside the cathedral; in , grenades were hurled at it twice , damaging the building.

The Islamic State claimed the most recent attack in a statement, adding that the massacre was carried out by "two knights of martyrdom" against a "crusader temple.

For decades, Islamic separatist groups have been waging a war of terrorism — replete with bombings, burnings, and beheadings including of two Canadian men — that has left an estimated , people dead.

As seen in the most recent attack, for some separatists, apparently nothing less than a religiously supremacist State — modeled after the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria — where the most severe dictates of sharia are enforced, churches are banned, Christians are subjugated, and sex slaves are openly sold, will do.

In other words, the new terrorism in the Philippines is not merely inspired by political or territorial grievances, real or imagined, but rather is imbued with intrinsic hate for the "other" — for the "infidel.

In May , for instance, an extremist uprising erupted in the majority-Muslim city of Marawi. In one incident, a civilian bus was stopped by jihadis; when 9 passengers were discovered to be Christian — apparently because they were not able to quote the Koran — they were tied together and shot dead , execution style.

Extremists in nations such as Kenya and Nigeria have also been known to separate Muslims from Christians before slaughtering the non-Muslims.

April 29, A bomb explosion rocked St. Many feel, with just cause, that integration amounts to cultural and psychological genocide. For over 10 years the Moro National Liberation Front has been waging a war of secession against the Marcos government.

While Islam was contained in the southern islands, Spain conquered and converted the remainder of the islands to Hispanic Christianity. The Spanish seldom had to resort to military force to win over converts, instead the impressive display of pomp and circumstance, clerical garb, images, prayers, and liturgy attracted the rural populace.

To protect the population from Muslim slave raiders, the people were resettled from isolated dispersed hamlets and brought "debajo de las companas" under the bells , into Spanish organized pueblos.

This set a pattern that is evident in modern Philippine Christian towns. These pueblos had both civil and ecclesiastical authority; the dominant power during the Spanish period was in the hands of the parish priest.

The church, situated on a central plaza, became the locus of town life. Masses, confessions, baptisms, funerals, marriages punctuated the tedium of everyday routines.

The church calendar set the pace and rhythm of daily life according to fiesta and liturgical seasons. Market places and cockfight pits sprang up near church walls.

Gossip and goods were exchanged and villagers found "both restraint and release under the bells. The latter is commonly referred to as Filipino folk Christianity, combining a surface veneer of Christian monotheism and dogma with indigenous animism.

It may manifest itself in farmers seeking religious blessings on the irrice seed before planting or in the placement of a bamboo cross at the comer of a rice field to prevent damage by insects.

It may also take the form of a folk healer using Roman Catholic symbols and liturgy mixed with pre-Hispanic rituals.

When the United States took over the Philippines in the first half of the century, the justifications for colonizing were to Christianize and democratize.

The feeling was that these goals could be achieved only through mass education up until then education was reserved for a small elite.

Most of the teachers who went to the Philippines were Protestants, many were even Protestant ministers. There was a strong prejudice among some of these teachers against Catholics.

Since this Protestant group instituted and controlled the system of public education in the Philippines during the American colonial period, it exerted a strong influence.

Subsequently the balance has shifted to reflect much stronger influence by the Catholic majority.

During the period of armed rebellion against Spain, a nationalized church was organized under Gregorio Aglipay, who was made "Spiritualhead of the Nation Under Arms.

In the early part of the 20th century the numbers of Aglipayans peaked at 25 to 33 percent of the population. Today they have declined to about 5 percent and are associated with the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States.

Another dynamic nationalized Christian sect is the lglesia ni Kristo, begun around and founded by Felix Manolo Ysagun.

Along with the Aglipayans and Iglesia ni Kristo, there have been a proliferation of Rizalist sects, claiming the martyred hero of Philippine nationalism, Jose B.

Rizal as the second son of God and are incarnation of Christ. Leaders of these sects themselves often claim to be reincarnations of Rizal, Mary, or leaders of the revolution; claim that the apocalypse is at hand for non-believers; and claim that one can find salvation and heaven by joining the group.

These groups range from the Colorums of the s and s to the sophisticated P. Most of those who follow these cults are the poor, dispossessed, and dislocated and feel alienated from the Catholic church.

The current challenge to the supremacy of the Catholic church comes from a variety of small sects -- from the fundamentalist Christian groups, such as Jehovah's Witnesses and Seventh Day Adventists, to the lglesia ni Kristo and Rizalists.

The Roman Catholics suffer from a lack of personnel the priest to people ratio is exceedingly low , putting them at a disadvantage in gaining and maintaining popular support.

The Catholic church is seeking to meet this challenge by establishing an increasingly native clergy and by engaging in programs geared to social action and human rights among the rural and urban poor.

Many historians have claimed that the Philippines peacefully accepted Spanish rule; the reality is that many insurgencies and rebellions continued on small scales in different places through the Hispanic colonial period.

Gregorio Aglipay , the founder of Iglesia Filipina Independiente. For most Filipinos , the belief in God permeates many aspects of life. Christians celebrate important holidays in many different ways, the most important of which are Christmas , Lent and Holy Week , All Souls' Day , as well as many local fiestas honouring patron saints and especially the Virgin Mary.

Filipinos living and working in Metro Manila and occasionally those from the diaspora often return to their respective home provinces and towns to observe these holidays with their birth families, much like the practise in Mainland China for traditional holidays.

Filipino infants and individuals are more often than not expected to be baptised as Christians to affirm faith in Christ and membership in a specific denomination.

Christmas is the biggest holiday, and one of its most beloved rites is the Simbang Gabi or Misa de Gallo , a series of Masses held before dawn in the nine days preceding Christmas Day.

Devotees attend each Mass which is different from the otherwise Advent liturgy of the day elsewhere in anticipation of Christ's birth and to honour the Virgin Mary, along with the belief that attending the novena ensures fulfilment of a favour requested of God.

The second most important religious season is Lent, which commemorates Christ's Passion and Death , ending with Easter which celebrates the Resurrection.

Holy Week in the Philippines is a period especially rich in centuries-old tradition, which have undertones from indigenous customs and beliefs that date back to the pre-Christian period.

Adapted from the ancient Filipino art of orally transmitting poems through chant, the devotion is usually performed by groups of individuals, each member chanting in shifts to ensure complete, unbroken recitation of the text.

Processions are a staple throughout the week, the most important being on Holy Wednesday , Good Friday where the burial of Christ is reenacted with a town's Santo Entierro image and the joyous Salubong that precedes the first Mass on Easter Sunday.

Television and radio limit broadcasting hours and air mostly inspirational programming alongside the days' religious services; newspapers are also on hiatus, while shopping malls and most restaurants are closed to allow employees to return home.

Popular holiday spots such as Boracay often dispense with these customs, while many people use the long holiday for overseas travel instead of observing the traditional rites.

As with Christmas and Lent, most Filipinos also return home in the period the third most important in the calendar , but with the main intent of visiting and cleaning ancestral tombs.

Communities also hold the Santacruzan , which is part-procession honouring the finding of the Cross on its old Galician date , and part- fashion show for a town's maidens.

Examples of patronal fiestas are the Nativity of St John the Baptist every June 24, where communities under his patronage would celebrate his summertime birth by splashing other people with water, and the triduum of feasts known as the Obando Fertility Rites held in mid-May, where devotees dance for fertility in a custom that has ancient animist roots.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Filipino Christians Magellan's Cross. Middle East. North America. South America.

Lorenzo Ruiz , the first Filipino saint. Pedro Calungsod , a Filipino saint. Christianity portal.

Philippines Christians Video

Largest Gospel Choir - Manila, Philippines - Guinness World Records

Philippines Christians Video

SHOCKING PICTURES: Christian devotees in the Philippines are nailed to the cross Philippines christians Christians should not eclipse the numeric dominance of Catholic Christians among Philippine charismatic Christians: 70 percent of all Christians active in the. 8 Christians should recognize. 3 | Ibid, 4 | Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP), Pastoral Exhorta- tion on Philippine Politics, section D. Arenas, Erasto Legaspi () A Study of the Filipino Christian and His Political Responsibility. Cavite, Philippines. Ariel, Yaakov S. () Evangelizing the. Mary Help of Christians - Philippines, Mandaluyong City. Gefällt Mal · 53 Personen sprechen darüber. This page is dedicated to spread the devotion. Eddie is the Best for Philippine Democracy and Development? Urban Studies 42 8 — Philippine Law Journal, Ithaca: Southeast Asia Program, Pornstar natalie lust. Family 3d girlfriends Scoreboard Foucault, Michel Für eine Kritik der politischen Vernunft. Tokubetsu jugyou Pfarrerblatt 4— Diplomatic History 30 5 — Julian J. International Political Lana rhoades bangbros.com Review 32 5 — Bielefeld: Transcript. Manacsa, Rodelio Cruz und Alexander C. Mindanao, Bangsamoro: Bangsamoro Publications. Frankfurt a. Genato Rebullida, Ma. Shippensburg, PA: Destiny Image. Giantessporn in 5 Minuten. Studebaker, Steven M. Links: International Journal of Busty asian gf Renewal Bad Honnef: Horlemann. Philippines christians Köln: Köln, University, Diss. Public Culture 15 3 — By Douglas J. Harper, Anne C. März: 4. Hughes, Paul Day Honor in our Outreach. Porn sites easy for men to hide Africa: Lulu.

1 Gedanken zu “Philippines christians”

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *